British swatter faces up to 20 years in prison

The first British person charged for swatting could face a maximum 20 years imprisonment if convicted.

21-year-old Robert McDaid from Coventry has been charged in the US for calling a terrorism hotline in Maryland, posing as 20-year-old Tyran Dobbs and claiming he would kill three hostages unless a ransom of £12,000 was paid.

The real Tyran Dobbs was swatted and shot with rubber bullets, resulting in bruised lungs and broken facial bones, The Independent reports.

 

"I want them to pay for my medical damages and I want whoever shot me in my face to have to do some time."
Victim Tyran Dobbs

 

The US Department of Justice said that US gamer Zachary Lee had apparently asked Robert to carry out the swatting.

Prosecutors in the US are working with UK officials 'to ensure Robert McDaid is held accountable for his alleged actions'.

Victim Tyran Dobbs said in an interview with ABC 7: "How did y'all not trace this call back? How did y'all not figure out where it came from?

"I want justice. I want them to pay for my medical damages and I want whoever shot me in my face to have to do some time."

Officers did find drugs at the property. Howard County Police said the people inside the victim's apartment thought police were raiding because of that, not because of a fake hostage situation.

"Investigators believe that Mr Dobbs, who has been cooperative with police, was targeted by an online gamer," a statement read. "The investigation has led detectives to work with the FBI and Interpol.

"Without question, Mr. Dobbs was targeted and victimized in this case by a fellow online gamer. The incident demonstrates the extreme risk and danger of swatting calls.

 

"Swatting incidents are growing in frequency and police are continually working to identify those responsible."
Howard County Police

 

"Police would urge people to never provide personal information online. Police also urge anyone who is contacted by officers to comply with their requests, even if they are confused about the police presence and don't know or understand the reason for the contact.

"Swatting incidents are growing in frequency and police are continually working to identify those responsible."

 

Image source: FreeImages.com/Elvis Santana

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